November 7, 2012

The Spy in Your Inbox

Sean Gallagher, Ars Technica


AP Photo

Everything on the Internet is monitored in some way. Companies track what you do at work through deep packet inspection to make sure you don't wander into territory forbidden by company policy, or dump corporate data to a remote server just before you give notice. The Web pages you visit and the HTML-based mass e-mails you open are logged and tracked by advertisers and marketers. And your boss can tell if you've ever opened that urgent message or not. But people usually don't throw it in your face and shatter whatever remaining illusions of privacy you might have, as someone did to my colleague Andrew Cunningham today."Oh, man, a PR person was just totally creepy at me," he interjected over IRC this morning.

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TAGGED: privacy, email

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